Menu

IMPROVE YOUR HEARING

Hearing plays a major role in our quality of life, from our emotional well-being and physical health to our careers and leisure activities. Yet millions of people who have hearing loss let it go untreated, despite research showing links between untreated hearing loss and increased risk of falls, depression, anxiety, hospitalizations and even dementia.

When we hear our best, there’s nothing stopping us from enjoying the sounds of laughter, music, nature or conversations with family and friends. Hearing these sounds help fuel us, and undeniably make moments more memorable and life more enjoyable.

When hearing is impaired, those sounds we’ve taken for granted fade — leading to a cascade of changes that could impact us emotionally.

•    Hearing loss might cause embarrassment

•    Missing favorite sounds might lead to sadness

•    Missing critical information could create anxiety

•    Not hearing conversations clearly might lead to feeling left out

•    And feeling left out can lead to depression and social isolation





Types of Hearing Loss

CONDUCTIVE HEARING LOSS: Conductive hearing loss can occur when there is damage or a blockage in the outer and/or middle ear. This can result in sound not being conducted adequately through the ear canal to the eardrum, or from the eardrum via the ossicles of the middle ear to the inner ear. It can be caused by earwax, a perforated eardrum, a build up of fluid in the middle ear from a cold or flu, (often referred to as ‘glue ear’), abnormal bone growth involving the ossicles, repeated ear infections and allergies. It is more common in children and indigenous populations. Medical interventions and technologies are often used to treat conductive hearing loss.


SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS: Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when there is damage or malfunction of the hair cells in the cochlear. Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of permanent hearing loss. Assistive technologies can help reduce the effects of sensorineural hearing loss.


MIXED HEARING LOSS: A mixed hearing loss occurs when both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are present. The sensorineural component of the hearing loss is permanent, while the conductive component may be permanent or temporary.


AUDITORY NEUROPATHY: Conductive hearing loss can occur when there is damage or a blockage in the outer and/or middle ear. This can result in sound not being conducted adequately through the ear canal to the eardrum, or from the eardrum via the ossicles of the middle ear to the inner ear. It can be caused by earwax, a perforated eardrum, a build up of fluid in the middle ear from a cold or flu, (often referred to as ‘glue ear’), abnormal bone growth involving the ossicles, repeated ear infections and allergies. It is more common in children and indigenous populations. Medical interventions and technologies are often used to treat conductive hearing loss.